words-of-emotion:

Good Vibes HERE
You think im a mess, i might be. As a matter of fact i am, yes i am a mess, messing your mind up, confusing you… Leaving you in deep wonder! Coz i am wonderful, hm hmm, yes i am!!!

You think im a mess, i might be. As a matter of fact i am, yes i am a mess, messing your mind up, confusing you… Leaving you in deep wonder! Coz i am wonderful, hm hmm, yes i am!!!

Make it happen. Shock everyone.
(via bon-za)
marahoffman:

Kojo Baiden. Cosmos, Omnipresence. Adinkra symbol of the Asante Tribe, Ghana.

marahoffman:

Kojo Baiden. Cosmos, Omnipresence. Adinkra symbol of the Asante Tribe, Ghana.

artmusicvegan:

Chef and food justice activist Bryant Terry's latest cookbook 'Afro-Vegan: Farm-Fresh African, Caribbean and Southern Flavors Remixed' is scheduled for release on April 8, 2014. In this groundbreaking cookbook Terry draws from African, Caribbean, and Southern food to create over 100 enticing vegan dishes. You can pre-order 'Afro-Vegan' via Amazon, iBooks, Google Books, IndieBound and Barnes & Noble.
The national book launch party will take place in Oakland, CA at SoleSpace on April 9, 2014, but you can also check Terry as he tours throughout the US (and a few venues in the Caribbean) in support of the new book.
"Rising star chef and food justice activist Bryant Terry is known for his simple, creative, and delicious vegan dishes inspired by African American cooking. In this landmark cookbook, he remixes foods of the African diaspora to create exciting and approachable recipes such as Jamaican Patties Stuffed with Maque Choux, Berebere-Spiced Black-Eyed Pea Sliders, Crispy Teff-Grit Cakes with Eggplant, Tomatoes, and Peanuts, and Groundnut Stew with Winter Vegetables and Cornmeal Dumplings. He also explores key African ingredients that are popular in Caribbean and Southern dishes—like okra—tracing their history and giving them cultural context. Afro-Vegan will delight Bryant Terry fans; vegetarians and vegans looking for exciting new recipes; cooks interested in African, Afro-Caribbean, and Southern cuisine; and health- and eco-conscious eaters."

artmusicvegan:

Chef and food justice activist Bryant Terry's latest cookbook 'Afro-Vegan: Farm-Fresh African, Caribbean and Southern Flavors Remixed' is scheduled for release on April 8, 2014. In this groundbreaking cookbook Terry draws from African, Caribbean, and Southern food to create over 100 enticing vegan dishes. You can pre-order 'Afro-Vegan' via AmazoniBooksGoogle Books, IndieBound and Barnes & Noble.

The national book launch party will take place in Oakland, CA at SoleSpace on April 9, 2014, but you can also check Terry as he tours throughout the US (and a few venues in the Caribbean) in support of the new book.

"Rising star chef and food justice activist Bryant Terry is known for his simple, creative, and delicious vegan dishes inspired by African American cooking. In this landmark cookbook, he remixes foods of the African diaspora to create exciting and approachable recipes such as Jamaican Patties Stuffed with Maque Choux, Berebere-Spiced Black-Eyed Pea Sliders, Crispy Teff-Grit Cakes with Eggplant, Tomatoes, and Peanuts, and Groundnut Stew with Winter Vegetables and Cornmeal Dumplings. He also explores key African ingredients that are popular in Caribbean and Southern dishes—like okra—tracing their history and giving them cultural context. Afro-Vegan will delight Bryant Terry fans; vegetarians and vegans looking for exciting new recipes; cooks interested in African, Afro-Caribbean, and Southern cuisine; and health- and eco-conscious eaters."

universalayititoma:

frantzfandom:

anarcho-queer:

WikiLeaks: Obama Administration Pressured Haiti’s President To Lower Minimum Wage
A Wikileaks post published on The Nation shows that the Obama Administration fought to keep Haitian wages at 31 cents an hour.
Contractors for Fruit of the Loom, Hanes and Levi’s worked in close concert with the US Embassy when they aggressively moved to block a minimum wage increase for Haitian assembly zone workers, the lowest-paid in the hemisphere, according to secret State Department cables.
It started when Haiti passed a law two years ago raising its minimum wage to 61 cents an hour. According to an embassy cable:
This infuriated American corporations like Hanes and Levi Strauss that pay Haitians slave wages to sew their clothes. They said they would only fork over a seven-cent-an-hour increase, and they got the State Department involved. The U.S. ambassador put pressure on Haiti’s president, who duly carved out a $3 a day minimum wage for textile companies (the U.S. minimum wage, which itself is very low, works out to $58 a day).
Haiti has about 25,000 garment workers. If you paid each of them $2 a day more, it would cost their employers $50,000 per working day, or about $12.5 million a year … As of last year Hanes had 3,200 Haitians making t-shirts for it. Paying each of them two bucks a day more would cost it about $1.6 million a year. Hanesbrands Incorporated made $211 million on $4.3 billion in sales last year.
Thanks to U.S. intervention, the minimum was raised only to 31 cents.
The revelation of US support for low wages in Haiti’s assembly zones was in a trove of 1,918 cables made available to the Haitian weekly newspaper Haïti Liberté by the transparency group WikiLeaks. As part of a collaboration with Haïti Liberté, The Nation is publishing English-language articles based on those cables.

they been doing this since the clinton administration too

anpi yo ape di se peyi zanmi an nou yo ye…

universalayititoma:

frantzfandom:

anarcho-queer:

WikiLeaks: Obama Administration Pressured Haiti’s President To Lower Minimum Wage

A Wikileaks post published on The Nation shows that the Obama Administration fought to keep Haitian wages at 31 cents an hour.

Contractors for Fruit of the Loom, Hanes and Levi’s worked in close concert with the US Embassy when they aggressively moved to block a minimum wage increase for Haitian assembly zone workers, the lowest-paid in the hemisphere, according to secret State Department cables.

It started when Haiti passed a law two years ago raising its minimum wage to 61 cents an hour. According to an embassy cable:

This infuriated American corporations like Hanes and Levi Strauss that pay Haitians slave wages to sew their clothes. They said they would only fork over a seven-cent-an-hour increase, and they got the State Department involved. The U.S. ambassador put pressure on Haiti’s president, who duly carved out a $3 a day minimum wage for textile companies (the U.S. minimum wage, which itself is very low, works out to $58 a day).

Haiti has about 25,000 garment workers. If you paid each of them $2 a day more, it would cost their employers $50,000 per working day, or about $12.5 million a year … As of last year Hanes had 3,200 Haitians making t-shirts for it. Paying each of them two bucks a day more would cost it about $1.6 million a year. Hanesbrands Incorporated made $211 million on $4.3 billion in sales last year.

Thanks to U.S. intervention, the minimum was raised only to 31 cents.

The revelation of US support for low wages in Haiti’s assembly zones was in a trove of 1,918 cables made available to the Haitian weekly newspaper Haïti Liberté by the transparency group WikiLeaks. As part of a collaboration with Haïti Liberté, The Nation is publishing English-language articles based on those cables.

they been doing this since the clinton administration too

anpi yo ape di se peyi zanmi an nou yo ye…